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japaneseaesthetics:

A fine Satsuma bottle vase
By Yabu Meizan, Meiji period (late 19th century) Designed with a compressed ovoid body and slender neck terminating in a garlic bulb mouth and decorated in polychrome enamels and gilt on a clear crackle glaze with a Daimyo procession above bands of misty pines, the shoulder with an overlapping floral collar punctuated with a geometric band, the neck with trailing wisteria and sparrows, the rim with ashibori dot band, and the foot with a key-fret band, signed Yabu Meizan in gilt 6 1/8in (15.5cm) high.  Text and images via Bonhams

japaneseaesthetics:

A fine Satsuma bottle vase

By Yabu Meizan, Meiji period (late 19th century)
Designed with a compressed ovoid body and slender neck terminating in a garlic bulb mouth and decorated in polychrome enamels and gilt on a clear crackle glaze with a Daimyo procession above bands of misty pines, the shoulder with an overlapping floral collar punctuated with a geometric band, the neck with trailing wisteria and sparrows, the rim with ashibori dot band, and the foot with a key-fret band, signed Yabu Meizan in gilt
6 1/8in (15.5cm) high.  Text and images via Bonhams

art-of-swords:

Tanto Dagger

  • Dated: Koto era
  • Measurements: 11 3/4 inches overall, 7 inch blade

The dagger has a blade fitted with a golden collar, showing a deeply carved bonshi horimono on the right side of the blade and a spearhead pattern on the left. The signature on the tang attributes the blade to “Kanemitsu”, in the later portion of the Koto era.

The black lacquer panels feature golden floral accents are present on the sides of the hilt and sheath, with the edges and tips, along with the tsuba, decorated with raised cherry blossoms with golden accents.

The mekugi is topped with a pair of 3/4 inch long golden butterflies, and a three dimensional gold accented silver flower arrangement serves as a suspension band on the back edge. The dagger has a 6 inch long two-piece kogai with 5 carved symbols on the front of each side, and a two symbol signature on the back with a golden three symbol signature inside the slot.

Sidenotes:

  1. Swords/blades made during the Heian period (794-1185) through the late Muromachi Era (1573-1599) are called Koto, and are classified in terms of the Gokaden, the five schools that developed in the provinces of Yamashiro, Yamato, Bizen, Soshu, and Mino.
  2. During the Koto period, the features of the jigane varied significantly because of the different materials used in each province. Swords made during this period can be recognized by the forging style, often down to the specific smith.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Rock Island Auction

(via virtual-artifacts)

design-is-fine:

Sweat Protector, 1850–1860. Paper technique: 4-strand plaiting with 2-strand twists. Japan

Woven textiles made from paper find their origin in 16th century Japan where these cloths – called shifu – were most likely developed by the impoverished rural population for lack of other materials. Farmers originally cut the pages of ancient account books in order to turn them into shifu weaves. Soon this cloth attained a place in society as the Samurai refined the technique, in which the finest threads could be woven into noble cloths. Via Cooper Hewitt

design-is-fine:

Sweat Protector, 1850–1860. Paper technique: 4-strand plaiting with 2-strand twists. Japan

Woven textiles made from paper find their origin in 16th century Japan where these cloths – called shifu – were most likely developed by the impoverished rural population for lack of other materials. Farmers originally cut the pages of ancient account books in order to turn them into shifu weaves. Soon this cloth attained a place in society as the Samurai refined the technique, in which the finest threads could be woven into noble cloths. Via Cooper Hewitt